Dermatologist Explains: 4 Treatments for Rosacea

Dermatologist Explains: 4 Treatments for Rosacea

If you’ve been following us for a while, you’ll know that we’ve been raising awareness for and educating people about rosacea for as long as Rosalique has been around. That’s because, whilst people with all skin types can use Rosalique, our gentle formula and unique combination of properties means that a large part of our customers struggle with this skin condition. Although more research is coming out, properly diagnosing and treating rosacea can still be very difficult. We regularly hear from customers who have tried a range of options to no avail, which can be incredibly frustrating. To give you a good idea of your options, we’ve asked Dr Sebastian Pfeifer, co-founder of the online dermatology app DERMAFY, to give us some insight into the most common ways of treating the appearance of rosacea.

"Rosacea progresses in different stages. Initially, increased vessels (telangieectasias) appear on the facial skin, which leads to redness. As the disease progresses, further inflammation can lead to small nodules (papules) and pus pimples (pustules). At this stage, the disease somewhat resembles acne. If rosacea is not treated adequately, it can lead to coarsening of the skin pores (sebaceous gland hyperplasia) and in the worst case to a so-called bulbous nose (rhinophyma). The symptoms can be very unpleasant for those affected and affect their self-confidence.

Thanks to extensive research into this common skin condition, there are now many different treatment options that can help to reduce the symptoms and achieve a permanently better skin appearance. We present the most common treatment methods below:

Medication:
When using medication, we distinguish between topical therapy (creams or gels) and oral therapy (tablets). Your doctor, dermatologist, or other medical professional will choose the therapy according to the stage of rosacea. In milder forms of rosacea, where redness is the main symptom, using medication as a treatment is difficult. In this case, creams containing bromidine are sometimes used, to encourage the capillaries to constrict and the redness to disappear. Another option is using cream containing ivermectin, an antiparasitic drug that works against the demodex mites on the skin. Dermodex mites are part of the natural skin flora and are present in all people, but they seem to be present in far greater numbers in those with rosacea, leading some to believe there is a causal relationship between the two. For severely inflamed rosacea with papules and pustules, antibiotic-containing creams and light fruit acid peels, which can also be used for acne, for example, are helpful.

If creams are not giving the desired effect, it could be worth trying tablets – usually antibiotics from the tetracycline family. These are preferably administered in low doses over a period of about six weeks so that they do not have an antibacterial effect but primarily an anti-inflammatory effect. For all therapies using medication, it is important that the creams or tablets are prescribed by a doctor, as they can sometimes have severe side effects and are therefore not suitable for every patient.

Laser therapy: In rosacea, where the redness and fine vessels (telangieectasias) are the main concern, laser treatment can be very useful. A special vascular laser is used for this purpose, which shrinks down the capillaries. Laser therapy provides a visible improvement and will also reduce inflammatory markers in the skin, leading to fewer papules and pustules over time.

Skincare: Good skincare is an important component in the treatment of rosacea. It cannot be said often enough: first and foremost is sun protection. Proper cleansing of the face is also important, using only mild products that do not irritate the skin. Aggressive peelings and cleansers should be avoided completely. Instead, opt for gentle products that soothe and moisturize already during the cleansing process. Check out more rosacea skincare tips in this 
blog.

Camouflage: Of course, camouflaging (using makeup) is always an option to reduce the visible symptoms of rosacea. However, care should be taken not to use products that can irritate the sensitive, rosacea-prone skin or clog the pores. The most suitable make-up products are those that are specially adapted to rosacea.”


Hopefully, this article will give you an idea of the options that are available to you when going down the official treatment route for your rosacea-prone skin. Please be kind to yourself and remember that progress is not always linear, there might be some trial and error involved as rosacea is not a one-size-fits-all. As Dr. Pfeifer puts it: “It is important to find an individual therapy tailored to the patient. With patience and the right treatment, it is possible to reduce the symptoms and achieve a better skin appearance - so that you can feel completely comfortable in your skin again."

If you’re not yet seeing the desired effects of your treatment, if treatment is not available to you, or if you have reason to not seek treatment, just know that our 3 in 1 Anti-Redness Miracle Formula SPF50 is a brilliant option to make you feel more comfortable in your own skin. Rosalique’s green microcapsules not only effectively camouflage redness, it also contains 5 active anti-inflammatory ingredients as well as an SPF50 for optimal daily protection. Finally, we’d also recommend looking into nutrition, stress reduction, and other lifestyle factors to manage rosacea naturally - you can learn more about that on our blog.

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